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GCC begins anti-dumping investigation into Chinese pipes

GCC begins anti-dumping investigation into Chinese pipes

The investigation follows an anti-dumping law proposal from the UAE’s government advisory council in January

The Gulf Cooperation Council has begun an anti-dumping investigation covering non-welded pipe imports from China used for oil and gas exploration.

UAE state news agency WAM reports that the investigation was announced by Khalifa bin Said Al-Abri, assistant secretary-general, economic and development affairs following recommendations from the Office of the Technical Secretariat.

It includes iron and steel pipes with a radius not exceeding 16 inches, according to the publication.

“GCC countries are strengthening laws and actively investigating offenders to protect new and growing industries from a flood of cheap imports as part of wider efforts to diversify their economies by establishing robust industrial platforms,” WAM said.

The investigation follows an anti-dumping law proposal from the UAE’s government advisory council in January to protect industry in the country from foreign goods flooding the market.

Read: UAE proposes anti-dumping law to help diversification drive

Abdulla al-Saleh, undersecretary for foreign trade and industry at the country’s economy ministry, said in November that the GCC states were studying whether to raise import duties on steel to protect local producers.

This followed an announcement from the US International Trade Commission that it would be taking measures against the UAE, Oman and Pakistan relating to circular welded carbon-quality steel pipes.

“There is a proposal on the table and GCC members are studying it. Hopefully, they will reach the agreement which is not about protecting the market but it’s protecting the fair competition in the market,” Saleh was quoted as saying.

Read: UAE may refer US to trade entity WTO over steel pipes dumping charge

Chinese producers, which account for around half of global supply, have been blamed for a slump in global steel prices after flooding export markets.

The Gulf countries have traditionally kept steel tariffs low to support the construction sector.

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