Dubai’s Emirates slashes US fares after opposition to new Newark service

The carrier was accused of violating its air services agreement after announcing a new service to Newark via Athens



Dubai’s Emirates has slashed fares to 12 US destinations just days after being accused of violating its air services agreement by am American airline group.

The carrier was accused of “flagrantly violating” the air services agreement that allows it to fly to the United States by the Partnership for Open & Fair Skies after announcing flights from Dubai to Newark, near New York, via Athens.

The group, which includes US airlines Delta, American and United said it would discuss the matter with the administration of new US President Donald Trump.

Read: Emirates’ flight to New York via Athens violates US agreement – US airlines

Emirates said from today until February 3, special economy and business class fares would be available to New York, Fort Lauderdale, Chicago, Washington, Boston, Dallas, Houston, Toronto, Los Angeles, Orlando, San Francisco and Seattle for bookings until November 30.

The Dubai-Athens-Newark route would be Emirates’ second ‘fifth freedom’ flight to the United States in addition to an existing daily Dubai-Milan-New York service. It also operates three daily direct Dubai-New York flights and 17 in total to US cities.

Emirates president Sir Tim Clark said the carrier was launching the Newark service, which will begin on March 12, following an approach from the Greek government.

Read: Dubai’s Emirates to launch daily Newark flights via Athens

The Partnership for Open & Fair Skies Gulf carriers Emirates, Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways of receiving over $50bn in unfair subsidies. The three deny the allegations.

The Obama administration began informal consultations with the United Arab Emirates and Qatar on the issue, but no agreement was reached before President Obama’s term ended.

Not all US airlines support the allegations and Emirates has forged codeshare deals for internal flights with Alaskan Airlines and JetBlue.

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